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EdTech Workshop 2019 Sessions

Below are the videos from the EdTech Workshop 2021 which took place on May 07, 2021 virtually. 

PROJECT FILES
Type: Video Links
Title Author Description Copyright
Adapting group projects and software development skills training to online teaching: CIV550 Case Example | Link Prof. Jennifer Drake

The move to online delivery meant that the curriculum for CIV550 Water Resources Engineering needed to undergo substantial restructuring. Throughout the course, a Group Floodplain Mapping project served as a teaching tool that linked Lecture materials all term. Students were introduced to numerous GIS webtools, R (a statistical package), OTTHYMO (a hydrologic modelling program) and HEC-RAS (a hydraulic modelling project) through asynchronous modules and applied these analysis tools to evaluate flood risks to an Ontario community. This presentation will discuss the advantages and challenges encountered executing such an ambitious group project and teaching software remotely.

Keep, Toss, or Re-purpose? What are the post-COVID trends that will shape higher education? | Link Dr. Susan McCahan

Opening Keynote: I will discuss the overall trends in higher education and what we are likely to see post-pandemic. This will include trends such as blended learning, microcredentials, and a rise in learning analytics.

 
 
 

 

Pandemic or not, virtual has value | Link Prof. Philip Asare

Virtual/online components of a course seem to have value and advantages that cannot be replicated by in-person components. Having had experience with virtual work before the pandemic, I think the pandemic presents an opportunity to motivate the utility of online components. I'll be talking about a class I'm planning along these lines and what I have learned during the forced online mode of operation that could be useful.

 
 
 

 

One Year of Teaching Online: Lessons Learned | Link Prof. Sanjeev Chandra

What have we learned from our experience in teaching online? What worked, and what did not? What can we use to improve teaching even as we go back to in person lectures? What would an online-course look like in the future, given time and resources to prepare?

Hitting repeat: Lessons learned from teaching music theory online | Link Dr. Daphne Tan

This presentation discusses the pedagogical challenges and rewards of adapting a large-enrolment undergraduate music theory course for the online environment. The pre-COVID model of two in-person lectures a week was converted to a model of asynchronous material plus one synchronous online lecture. This new hybrid approach (a flipped classroom) will be carried forward into Winter 2022, even when we return to in-person teaching

 

Better than paper exams | Link Mr. Kia Shakiba

The recent shift to online learning, while stressful, may have been a necessary step in the overall improvement of how we conduct assessments. Students have been doing handwritten examinations for hundreds of years, but are they really the best way to gauge a student's understanding of a topic in modern times? In this talk, I will be discussing the limitations of paper-based and existing solutions for online exams and how Examify has become a valuable tool in many courses on campus to improve this experience. I will demonstrate how Examify is also being used as a learning tool to help students get a better understanding of course material outside of the exam room.

 

Can ungrading be a mainstay in assessment? | Link Dr. Jennifer Harris

The practice of "ungrading," that is, equipping students to evaluate their own work according to instructor-designed guidelines and rubrics, has be gaining some momentum. In this presentation, I will present an example of using "ungrading" in a seminar this past year to illustrate its benefits and limitations.

 

Asynchronous video lectures as real as they get | Link Prof. Michael Stumm

I will present how I created lecture videos that are as close to the real thing as possible. I will provide examples of the lectures and describe how they were created, including the technology used. Before the session, check out an example video: ECE353 F1 Synchronization Introduction from the course or play the video below (please note that you will need to be logged into MyMedia with your UTORid and password to view the video).

 

Learning Through Podcasts | Link Prof. Lisa Romkey, Prof. Robert Irish

Online learning in 2020 inspired some new thinking on the best ways for students to share their knowledge, and how to engage technology in new ways to create a meaningful learning experience. In this session, we'll share our experience in designing and facilitating a paired podcast assignment, and how we plan to "recycle" this as a teaching and learning practice!

 

Using Digital Whiteboards to Achieve Collaborative Learning Activities | Link Prof. Chris Bouwmeester

I want to show you how you might use Miro to achieve your own collaborative learning activities. For example: I used dot voting to understand the rhetorical approach used in written proposals. More importantly, I can tell you how to avoid making the same mistakes I made in creating these whiteboard workshops.

 

From online teaching back to a TEAL classroom | Link Dr. Olivier St-Cyr

I am going to talk about aspects of online teaching I learned about in the last year that I plan to keep once I move back to a TEAL classroom. Our TEAL classroom in the Bissell building is equipped with wireless touch screen technology and I want to show how additional equipment and online tools I acquired to teaching online during the pandemic will be beneficial for TEAL teaching in hybrid or in-person courses.

 

0 to 100: Coordinating and teaching a large introductory First-year Engineering course at UofT (from your living room) | Link Prof. Chirag Variawa

What's it like to welcome the first all-online class of First-year Engineering students to UofT? What's it like to do so having near-zero experience in online teaching, especially when you're doing so from your living room? Going from 0-to-1100 real quick also means meticulous planning, from tech equipment to course design and pedagogy. Here's what it was like, and what we learned... and unmuting oneself is just the tip of the iceberg.

 

Onscreen vs In-hand: Delivering a Hands-on Design Course During the Pandemic | Link Miss Crystal Liu

Transitioning to remote teaching is hard, delivering a hands-on design course remotely could be harder. This year we redeveloped a hands-on project course - MSE398 Materials Manufacturing and Design Lab - to include both virtual and physical components. I will be sharing how we ran the course and some lessons learnt.

Virtual Labs: From Research to Reality | Link Dr. Kimia Moozeh

Based on results from my PhD thesis on laboratory based learning, we’re embarking on a project to build a few chemistry and environment virtual labs. What makes this project different is that we’re developing the labs based on learning theoretical frameworks such as multimedia. Moreover, we are focusing on enabling students to reflect on their experience, and connect theory with practice, while establishing relevance to the real world. In this session, I’ll review the evidence from my research, and talk about the next steps in this project.

 

From online teaching back to a TEAL classroom Dr. Olivier St-Cyr

I am going to talk about aspects of online teaching I learned about in the last year that I plan to keep once I move back to a TEAL classroom. Our TEAL classroom in the Bissell building is equipped with wireless touch screen technology and I want to show how additional equipment and online tools I acquired to teaching online during the pandemic will be beneficial for TEAL teaching in hybrid or in-person courses.

From online teaching back to a TEAL classroom Dr. Olivier St-Cyr

I am going to talk about aspects of online teaching I learned about in the last year that I plan to keep once I move back to a TEAL classroom. Our TEAL classroom in the Bissell building is equipped with wireless touch screen technology and I want to show how additional equipment and online tools I acquired to teaching online during the pandemic will be beneficial for TEAL teaching in hybrid or in-person courses.

The 5 steps that allowed me to plan ahead to reduce, recycle but not necessarily re-use assessments in a course during and post-pandemic | Link Prof. Bill Ju

When you have to continually pivot, is it possible to plan with uncertainty in mind? I have found ways to teach online more effectively using 5 steps - using a teaching team, having students as partners, re-assessing learning outcomes, understanding academic integrity issues and leveraging existing edtech. These 5 steps were applied to every assessment in a variety of courses and allowed me to streamline how to reduce the time on assessment creation (i.e. did you know T/F was so effective), reuse lecture material in assessments (open-book but effective), without having to radically recycle multiple choice questions. In this session I will discuss the length of time this process takes to create both timed synchronous and take home style assessments that use these steps, create more meaningful questions but do not take more time (which no one ever has - pandemic or not)